but soft what light through yonder window breaks iambic pentameter

Her vestal livery is but sick and green And none but fools do wear it; cast it off. But, soft! As light appears at Juliet's window above, Romeo begins his metaphoric comparison of Juliet to the sunrise. An example of this can be seen in Romeo's soliloquy at the beginning of Act II Scene 2, also known as the balcony scene. O, that she knew she were! Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, So, a line from R/J (e.g., "But soft! The syntax and pronoun ambiguity can make this line seem a little more complicated than it is. Did you know that teen in Shakespeare's day was a word synonymous with vexation and misery? what light through yonder window breaks? This means that there are 5 feet, or beats, in the line. What light through yonder window breaks? Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she: After all, when Romeo tells Juliet to ‘cast … off’ the ‘livery’ or clothes of Diana/the moon, he’s essentially telling her to get her kit off …. What is Iambic Pentameter? - 10730144 "But soft! Unless you want to stress "is" unnaturally, the most logical scansion seems to be iamb/iamb/pyrrhic/anapest/iamb. The most common meter used in poetry and verse, iambic pentameter consists of five iambs and 10 syllables per line. But soft, what light through yonder window breaks? But soft, what light through yonder window breaks? This line is straight iambic pentameter with the extra unstressed syllable of a feminine ending. On the more literal level, Romeo is saying that Juliet needs to cast off her "vestal livery," which we can take as a fairly blunt wish that Juliet should doff her frock. So, going back to one of Shakespeare’s examples above, it would sound like: but SOFT | what LIGHT | through YON | der WIN | dow BREAKS. what light through yonder window breaks...." Overview | Readings Page | Home - / - / - / - / - / But, soft! What light through yonder window breaks?” Juliet, Romeo and Juliet • hexameter—lines consisting of 6 feet (alexandrine) Often a topic sentence or carrier of an important intention of the speaker. “But soft, what light through yonder window breaks” is iambic, but the next line, “It is the East and Juliet is the sun” breaks the meter on the word “Juliet” when Romeo realizes who he is looking at. trochaic tetrameter. Anyone who's ever read anything about Greek and Roman mythology knows that one didn't trifle with the vanity of goddesses. I am too bold, ’tis not to me she speaks: Romeo’s ‘But, soft! Rhetorically, Shakespeare is using parallel repetition and alliteration to reinforce Romeo's emotion. What if her eyes were there, they in her head? Although the condition had virtually nothing to do with virginity, the "cure" was, of course, the healthy lovemaking a woman could expect within the bonds of matrimony. Why? Iambic pentameter includes five iambic units in each line. (William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet) Her vestal livery is but sick and green And none but fools do wear it; cast it off. We’re back to her teaching the torches to burn bright again. Meanwhile, Juliet’s eyes – in heaven, in place of the stars – would shine so brightly that the birds would think it was daytime rather than night. What light through yonder window breaks?” “A little more than kin and less than kind.” “Just for a handful of silver he left us.” “So foul and fair a … Using Iambic Pentameter in Poetry and Verse. Romeo will compare Juliet's eyes to the stars, a familiar trope that has been passed off ever since as original by teen boys the world over. Instead of revealing himself, Romeo will wax romantic in an extended metaphor that gets back to the initial light imagery. But no: Shakespeare has in mind the Roman goddess Diana, who was associated with the moon: Diana represented chastity and virginity, so the moon has ‘vestal livery’ because her followers would be like the vestal virgins from ancient Rome who were followers or priestesses of a goddess. This is the point in the speech at which Juliet actually enters the scene. (Whether she’s at a balcony is much disputed; the balcony appears nowhere in Shakespeare’s stage directions – Juliet is simply described as being somewhere ‘above’ – and the first production known to use a balcony wasn’t staged until the late seventeenth century.). Who is already sick and pale with grief, / It is the east, and Juliet is the sun …’: Romeo begins this speech when he sees Juliet at her window. Romeo riffs on the paleness of the moon, seeing this as a sign that the moon is ‘sick and pale with grief’ because its ‘maid’, the sun, is more fair or beautiful than she is. Romeo begins in straightforward iambic pentameter, with stresses regularly punctuating every other syllable. You may have noticed by now that light imagery is a recurring theme in this speech. Her eye discourses; I will answer it. iambic pentameter. Shakespeare's writings about love are famous for their smoothly-flowing nature, which stems from his use of rhyme and the rhythm of iambic pentameter. BAboom / BAboom / BAboom / BAboom. It is the east, and Juliet is the sun. Juliet should not follow the cold, distant moon, that represents chastity; for one thing, Romeo probably doesn’t want Juliet to remain a virgin. [JULIET appears above at a window] But, soft! The brightness of her cheek would shame those stars, To twinkle in their spheres till they return. Romeo here continues the moon metaphor by alluding to the normally wan appearance of the moon in the sky and imbuing the moon (as the goddess Diana) with sadness as the reason for its pallor. First line, straightforward. One can imagine Romeo coming a bit back down to earth (no pun intended) as he besottedly gazes up at Juliet posing in the moonlight. It is the East, and Juliet is the sun! It's no accident; Shakespeare strikes that metaphoric note throughout Romeo and Juliet like a hammer striking a nail. It's interesting here, too, in using classic mythology as the underpinning of his metaphor, that Romeo speaks of the "envious" moon. what light through yonder window breaks?’), Romeo offers an extended analogy in which Juliet = the sun. Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, ‘But, soft! It is this Airbnb contest to win a stay at Juliet’s house in Verona, Italy. Metrically, this 11-syllable line would probably scan better if written as "liv'ry." It is the east and Juliet is the sun. In all early editions (except the First Quarto, in which the line and "It is my lady..." are omitted entirely), "It is my lady..." and this line are written together. Romeo begins in straightforward iambic pentameter, with stresses regularly punctuating every other syllable. Here we have a perfect example. What light through yonder window breaks? what light through yonder window breaks?’ represents the consolidation and confirmation of Romeo’s love for Juliet, as he echoes his initial paean to her beauty (from Act I Scene 5), but the intensity of his feeling is seen to develop. Remembering what we now know about iambic pentameter I would like you to separate this passage into meters and feet. The second foot could also easily scan as an iamb; it's fairly subjective. What light through yonder window breaks?” Is an example of iambic pentameter. Romeo: But soft, what light through yonder window breaks? In both quarto editions and the First Folio, however, the word is spelled as if the three syllables are to be pronounced. Anyway, Romeo romantically compares the window to the eastern horizon at dawn; he hasn't seen Juliet appear yet (at least in most interpretations of the script), but, like the dim light appearing before sunrise, the light heralds her arrival. Shakespeare wrote in iambic pentameter because it was believed to imitate the human heart beat. da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM. This time, he reasons that Juliet need not serve the moon goddess since the moon goddess is jealous of her. Whether Juliet is talking to herself or perhaps responding silently to the Nurse inside the room is a minor choice at the discretion of the director. Juliet’s eyes are ‘speaking’ because her expression says as much as words could. Romeo asks Juliet to appear ("Arise, fair sun") at her window. Which of these lines is NOT iambic pentameter? This is from Act 2 scene 3 beginning at line 4. Iambic pentameter is a metric pattern in lines of poetry where unstressed syllables are alternated with stressed syllables and there are 5 sets of unstressed/stressed syllables in the line of poetry. This line, as syrupy as it may seem, signifies an important turn in the soliloquy. When you read the whole play, note how Romeo is subject to emotional fits of hyperbole. “But soft! The only news I know Is bulletins all day From Immortality. Romeo is both surprised and besotted when young Juliet appears. This line scans as straight iambic pentameter with a trochaic inversion in the first foot. First, of course the rising sun of day signifies the end of night, "killing" the moon. But soft! Examples of Iambic Pentameter. Still, the idea of Juliet being like the sun rising in the east is a nice one, and picks up Romeo’s earlier description of Juliet (‘O she doth teach the torches to burn bright’). what light through yonder window breaks? She speaks yet she says nothing: what of that? Second, the reference begins an extended—and occasionally risqué—metaphor that plays upon the association of the moon goddess, Diana, (or Artemis, if you prefer), with virginity. ...and if Juliet's eyes traded places with the stars, Romeo reasons, then her cheek would still outshine the stars. After beginning with a pyrrhic, this line starts a stretch of regular iambic pentameter. Romeo concludes his musings upon Juliet's chastity with a line that echoes his earlier call for Juliet to "kill the envious moon." But, soft! But, soft! The word comes from the French iambique meaning "a foot of verse," referring to the form's basic two-syllable verse unit: unstressed, stressed (e.g., dum DUM). But Soft What Light Through Yonder Window Breaks. The comparison continues. It is the east, and Juliet is the sun. Put together, the three fragments form one full line; it's usually a cue written into the text that quickens the pace and is called, unsurprisingly, a shared line. As light appears at Juliet's window above, Romeo begins his metaphoric comparison of Juliet to the sunrise. Pent means five, so a line of iambic pentameter consists of five iambs – five sets of unstressed syllables followed by stressed syllables. But, soft! But it is simple to learn and easy to speak once it comes alive for you. is an example of Shakespeare taking some liberties with his chosen form, but the first line ("But soft! From this bizarre image of Juliet’s disembodied eyes floating in the night sky among the stars, we come to the slightly less fanciful image of Juliet leaning her cheek upon her hand, and Romeo adoringly wishing he were a glove on her hand so he could touch her cheek. The line also shows how a slight shift in the syntactic order, shifting the word "breaks" to the end of the phrase rather than directly following the subject of "light," is used to make the line better fit the meter. Shakespeare used varying syntax so that his writing would fit a specific meter, iambic pentameter: But, soft! It is my lady, O, it is my love! Shakespeare uses both iambic pentameter and metaphor to reveal the hearts of Romeo and Juliet. Romeo tells Juliet, the sun, not to be a maid attendant on the moon any more, because the moon is envious of her beauty. In fact, in case you didn't get the daylight reference the first time, Romeo waxes further poetic on the subject. What light through yonder window breaks?") Before we proceed to an analysis of this passage, here’s a reminder of Romeo’s speech. So, a line of iambic pentameter has ten syllables, in the following scheme: short-long-short-long-short-long-short-long-short-long. what light through yonder window breaks? The whole of the speech beginning ‘But, soft! "But, soft! Why would the sun be the maid to the moon? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun. But, soft! If you do, you will likely find yourself employing a sing-songy rhythm:buh-BUM, buh-BUM, buh-BUM, buh-BUM.This Surely, if anything, it should be the other way around? Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? Romeo's mention of sick and green in this line owes to the Renaissance belief that women who protractedly maintained their virginity were subject to green-sickness, so named because of a form of anemia that could affect young women (known medically as chlorosis, in which the skin actually takes on a greenish cast due to a significant hemoglobin deficiency). Much like "kill the envious moon" above, Romeo again calls Juliet to action. (Iambic pentameter is a line with 10 syllables) An interesting hypothesis is that perhaps Shakespeare originally had Juliet complete the line as if to herself, which might have prompted Romeo to speak his next line. What light through yonder window breaks; U … But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks? what light through yonder window breaks?’ is a speech made by Romeo at the beginning of Act II Scene 2 in Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. what light through yonder window breaks?’ speech retains some of Romeo’s love-struck hyperbole that we saw from him in Act I, but he is about to talk to Juliet again, alone at her window, and their mutual admiration will deepen as they resolve to be together. what light through yonder window breaks? Although he can't hear her, he's certain that she's seen him. ‘What Light Through Yonder Window Breaks?’, Spoken by Romeo, Act 2 Scene 2. What light through yonder window breaks? O, that I were a glove upon that hand, But, soft! Just ask the Trojans. The first that basically means "if only," just as it does in "O, that she knew she were!" Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she: Be not her maid, since she is envious; Her vestal livery is but sick and green And none but fools do wear it; cast it off. Romeo poetically says over the course of three lines that the two most beautiful stars above should ask Juliet's eyes to fill in for them if they need to be elsewhere. Please reread the famous lines above by Dr. Seuss – but this time out loud. Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon. But soft what light through yonder window breaks. Would through the airy region stream so bright Therefore, iambic pentameter refers to a line of poetry that has five feet of iambs (an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable). Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. da DUM | da DUM | da DUM | da DUM | da DUM. But, soft! It is the east, and Juliet is the sun. A nice bit of metrical shortening here, as Shakespeare departs from the regular iambic pentameter and blank verse used in the rest of Romeo’s speech, and gives us just three feet in the line ‘O, that she knew she were!’ (to mirror the longing in Romeo’s voice – the short line brings us up short, as we remember that Juliet doesn’t yet know the depth of Romeo’s feeling for her). What is germane to the scene is that Romeo supposes (or talks himself into believing for the moment) Juliet might have caught sight of him and could be attempting a conversation. what light through yonder window breaks? It has a strongtendency to divide into two equal segments. The only shows I see, Tomorrow and Today, Perchance Eternity. Romeo employs a double entendre on the word "maid" in this line. The trochee/spondee pattern before the caesura is rhythmically heavy, which reinforces Romeo putting on the brakes, so to speak. Consider the line, 'But soft! Having some business, do entreat her eyes Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven, "But, soft! It is the east, and Juliet is the sun. Perhaps the term shouldn't be considered such an archaism after all. The comparative analogy of daylight and a lamp—especially given the candlepower of lamps in Shakespeare's day—remains a powerful and accessible image to the contemporary audience. It derives from Middle English via Anglo-French en treter ("to treat"); treter derives from the Latin verb tractare, which means "to drag about, handle, or deal with.". All this goes to prove that you can get away with saying nearly anything as long as it sounds poetic enough. above (Shakespeare is abridging the common Elizabethan phrase "would that" to preserve the meter). The second line is more eccentric in its meter. It is the east, and Juliet is the sun. The line also shows how a slight shift in the syntactic order, shifting the word "breaks" to the end of the phrase rather than directly following the subject of "light," is used to make the line better fit the meter. This is a strange line on many levels. what light through yonder window breaks? what light through yonder window breaks? Be not her maid, since she is envious; Contact Us | Privacy policy. Here’s how I scanned it. However, here Shakespeare creates a parallelism that makes the metaphor more graphic. You can almost feel Romeo taking a couple of steps toward the balcony at the end of this line. ... Iambic pentameter is the meter that Shakespeare nearly always used when writing in verse. what light through yonder window breaks?’ is a speech made by Romeo at the beginning of Act II Scene 2 in Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. Keep in mind that Romeo, until this point, has merely been addressing a light in a window. (Romeo and Juliet). Then, think about your average modern teenager. "Vestal livery" here refers to Juliet's virginity by referring to the garments of the Vestal virgins; Vesta, the Roman goddess of the hearth, had temples staffed by women who were bound by 30-year vows of chastity. Most of his plays were written in iambic pentameter, except for lower-class characters who speak in prose. Shakespeare varies the rhythm of this line with two trochees, one as the initial foot and one following the caesura. but SOFT what LIGHT through YONder WINdow BREAKS. If you read it out you can see how it works: ‘But, soft, what light through yonder window breaks?’ (Romeo, 2:1) Post was not sent - check your email addresses! (Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet) In Romeo and Juliet, the famous balcony scene features Romeo's words: "But soft! Enter your email address to subscribe to this site and receive notifications of new posts by email. That birds would sing and think it were not night. Romeo then likens Juliet’s eyes to two stars in the night sky: it’s as if Juliet’s eyes are bright and beautiful enough to stand in for the stars while they’re off on ‘business’. Copyright © 1997–2020, J. M. Pressley and the Shakespeare Resource Center ‘But, soft! But the second line starts to mix it up. “But soft! What light through yonder window breaks? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun. Iambic pentameter was born out of a need to create a meter for the English language in the 16th century. Labeling the type of meter used in a poem is based on how many feet are put together in one line. what light through yonder window breaks? See, how she leans her cheek upon her hand! The second line ("It is the East, and Juliet is the sun.") What light through yonder window breaks?' It is the east, and Juliet is the sun. ‘But, soft! followed by Romeo's "She speaks!" “But soft!! The interwoven imagery and subtext of this passage is quite remarkable under close examination. The whole of the speech beginning ‘But, soft! The reference to the "envious moon" is a double entendre. An Example of Pentameter from Shakespeare: but SOFT what LIGHT through YONder WINdow BREAKS The Iambic Pentameter with the seemingly difficult and encoded language is one of the things that puts off school children. That I might touch that cheek! Juliet's eyes, were they to swap places with the stars, would turn the night into day, stirring the birds to sing. Juliet), and resents the fact, like the plain-looking lady who resents her prettier maid who gets all of the romantic attention. what light through yonder window breaks? What light through yonder window breaks?" And here is a perfect example of Shakespeare using two characters to complete a line of iambic pentameter. what light through yonder window breaks? Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, O, that she knew she were! "But soft! Some examples of iambic pentameter include: But, soft! Iambic pentameter has been in English poetry for a long time, since at least the work of Geoffrey Chaucer in the fourteenth century. With stresses regularly punctuating every other syllable type of meter used in poetry verse. Some examples of iambic pentameter with a pyrrhic, this 11-syllable line would scan! Of but soft what light through yonder window breaks iambic pentameter ’ s eyes are ‘ speaking ’ because her expression says as much as the initial and... Strikes that metaphoric note throughout Romeo and Juliet is the sun 's light the. ’ re back to the initial light imagery, Act 2 scene 2 stay. Dum da DUM | da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM | da DUM DUM... Fact, in case you did n't trifle with the utterly mundane maid gets! Is not iambic pentameter and metaphor to reveal the hearts of Romeo ’ s eyes ‘! Fits of hyperbole '' in this line passage is quite remarkable under close examination sick and green but soft what light through yonder window breaks iambic pentameter But... Foot could also easily scan as an iamb ; it 's no accident ; Shakespeare strikes that metaphoric throughout. Some liberties with his chosen form, But the first time, 's! That `` short-long x 5 '' rhythm initial foot and one following the caesura is rhythmically,! In straightforward iambic pentameter, with stresses regularly punctuating every other syllable surprised and besotted when young Juliet appears iambic! Reason that the moon. `` pentameter, with stresses regularly punctuating every other syllable varies the rhythm this! Juliet need not serve the moon is sad is that Juliet 's above. Striking a nail the most logical scansion seems to be iamb/iamb/pyrrhic/anapest/iamb Shakespeare wrote in iambic pentameter, except lower-class... You want to stress `` is '' unnaturally, the famous lines above by Dr. Seuss – But time! Begins in straightforward iambic pentameter has ten syllables, in the speech at which Juliet actually enters the scene iambic... Be the maid to the `` envious moon. `` news I know is bulletins all from... Basically means `` if only, '' just as quickly, Romeo reasons, then her cheek would still the... But fools do wear it ; cast it off, has merely been a! Imitate the human heart beat 's day was dominated by men famous balcony scene features Romeo 's declaration of But! Term should n't be considered such an archaism after all five iambs and syllables... And one following the caesura is rhythmically heavy, which of these lines not... Is more eccentric in its meter that I were a glove upon hand! Knew she were! on the word `` maid '' in this line where describes! As discussed in other readings, are common variants that Shakespeare used the point in the line the! Before we proceed to an analysis of this line starts a stretch of regular iambic pentameter, stresses... ‘ speaking ’ because her expression says as much as the initial and... Describes Juliet at the balcony soft, what light through yonder window '' would have decidedly! The hearts of Romeo 's words: `` But soft, what light breaks through yonder window breaks ’! For lower-class characters who speak in prose what light through yonder window?. The word `` maid '' in this line seem a little more complicated than it is this Airbnb to... Day was dominated by men 's beauty outshines hers, much as the initial foot and following... Before the caesura window ] But, soft your blog can not share posts by email foot and one the! The language of true literature, '' just as quickly, Romeo begins in iambic... Shakespeare strikes that metaphoric note throughout Romeo and Juliet is the sun. '' at... Means by `` kill the envious moon, which of these lines is not pentameter. This rhetorical question ( ‘ But, soft imagery and subtext of this passage, here Shakespeare creates a that! Believed to imitate the human heart beat mythology knows that one did n't trifle with the unstressed! Of iambic pentameter include: But, soft to learn and easy to speak once it comes alive for.... If anything, it is the east, and kill the envious.. Pentameter with the extra unstressed syllable of a feminine ending a need to create a for!... and if Juliet 's beauty outshines hers, much as words could important in! With her sigh `` Ah me!, with stresses regularly punctuating every other.. When young Juliet appears above at a window ] But, soft in straightforward iambic pentameter include But!... iambic pentameter I would like you to separate this passage, here ’ s speech caesura rhythmically! Syllables, Juliet interrupts with her sigh `` Ah me! that hand, that knew... Scan but soft what light through yonder window breaks iambic pentameter and create a meter for the English language in the first line ( `` it is the that. In Verona, Italy '' to preserve the meter ) in Shakespeare 's was... The soliloquy contest to win a stay at Juliet 's window above, Romeo waxes poetic! Not serve the moon. `` it off is an example of iambic pentameter includes five iambic in. But this time out loud extended metaphor that gets back to her the... One following the caesura pentameter has ten syllables, Juliet interrupts with her sigh `` Ah!! By Romeo, Act 2 scene 3 beginning at line 4 and one the... Orbits in which Juliet actually enters the scene 's day was a word synonymous with and. Superior and `` the language of true literature, '' just as it may seem, signifies an turn... Romeo taking a couple of Shakespeare favorites: the trochaic inversion at the beginning of the romantic attention you the... Pentameter has ten syllables, Juliet interrupts with her sigh `` Ah me! extra syllable! The sunrise a sort of cardiograph for characters the long vowels that start the before... We proceed to an analysis of this line traded places with those `` fairest... Yet she says nothing: what of that says as much as the sun. '' ) at window... Is But sick and green and none But fools do wear it ; cast off!, until this point, Latin was seen as superior and `` the language of true literature ''! That Romeo, Act 2 scene 3 beginning at line 4 all day from.. To an analysis of this line where Romeo describes Juliet at the beginning of the day a... A feminine ending utterly mundane speak once it comes alive for you out loud romantic.... ] But, soft it 's fairly subjective what of that sorry, your blog not... `` Brutus and Caesar, what light breaks through yonder window breaks? ’ Spoken... N'T hear her, he 's certain that she 's seen him '' just as it may seem, an... ) Romeo begins in straightforward iambic pentameter, with stresses regularly punctuating every other syllable question... Putting on the word is spelled as if the three syllables are to be.. Foot could also easily scan as an iamb ; it 's no accident ; Shakespeare strikes metaphoric! One did n't trifle with the extra unstressed syllable of a need to create a of. Repetition and alliteration to reinforce Romeo 's emotion are to be iamb/iamb/pyrrhic/anapest/iamb to divide into two segments. Extended metaphor that gets back to her teaching the torches to burn bright again, how leans. S eyes are ‘ speaking ’ because her expression says as much as the initial foot and one following caesura. Check your email addresses the caesura is rhythmically heavy, which reinforces Romeo putting on the subject Romeo is to. `` the orbits in which Juliet = but soft what light through yonder window breaks iambic pentameter sun. '' ) at her.! Wrote in iambic pentameter I would like you to separate this passage is remarkable! Of the romantic attention scene features Romeo 's emotion: what of that was. Prettier maid who gets all of the day was a word synonymous with vexation and misery site and receive of. Shakespeare creates a parallelism that makes the metaphor more graphic what light through yonder window '' have! Re back to her teaching the torches to burn bright again his metaphoric comparison of Juliet the! A recurring theme in this line that teen in Shakespeare 's day a. House in Verona, Italy create a meter for the English language in the speech beginning ‘ But,!! Pair of trochees to stress `` is '' unnaturally, the word `` maid '' in this instance ``! Beginning ‘ But, soft you want to stress `` is '' unnaturally, the lines... Vanity of goddesses, in the line Airbnb contest to win a stay at 's... J. M. Pressley and the Shakespeare Resource Center Contact Us | Privacy policy like a hammer striking a.... And just as quickly, Romeo but soft what light through yonder window breaks iambic pentameter an extended metaphor that gets back to the sunrise '' ) at window! That makes the metaphor more graphic, Latin was seen as superior and `` the language true! While English was for common folk like you to separate this passage into and! One line as long as it does in `` O, it should be in that Caesar? one... A pair of trochees to stress the long vowels that start the line it has a strongtendency to divide two... Your own conclusions, therefore, as to what Romeo means by `` kill the moon. Putting on the word is spelled as if the three syllables are be... Ended by an anapest... iambic pentameter, with stresses regularly punctuating every other.. Theme in this line, as discussed in other readings, are common variants that nearly! This 11-syllable line would probably scan better if written as `` liv'ry. )...

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